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Wolves have been spotted in Oregon for the first time in 70 years!

 
by Isadora Frantz September 03, 2018
 

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A photo captured in Oregon earlier this month is sending cheers throughout the community of animal lovers across the US.

 

 
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At first sight, it seems like any other photograph with a family of gray wolves hanging out together – two tiny pups being monitored by their mother. But this picture is a result of decades of efforts to return wolves to the state of Oregon, a place where they had been completely wiped off.

 

Seventy years ago, there were no wolves living in Oregon; the excessive hunting and habitat loss had terrible consequences on the wolf population that had been living in the region for centuries.

 

But thanks to the efforts and protections stemming from the Endangered Species Act, gray wolves are now back in Oregon! The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs have been closely working together to restore the wolf population. The first positive news came in 2014 when a male wolf was spotted in the area; two years after that, a female wolf was discovered patroling the forests – conservationists were hoping the animals were mates and, indeed, this was the case.

Wolf pups have now been born in the Mount Hood habitat, something that has not been documented since the 1940s.

 

Wolf advocates are extremely happy about the news: The birth of these adorable puppies is a very important milestone for the conservation of the species – Maggie Howell, the executive director of the Wolf Conservation Center concluded.

 

Brooks Fahy, executive director of Predator Defense, was thrilled by the news: I knew the wolves back in the 1970s, so this has a special meaning to me; I always dreamt of the days wolves will be back in the area.

 

While wildlife officials acknowledge there is still much to be done to help the wolves in the United States, everyone is taking a moment to enjoy this extremely great news.

 
 
 
The photo showing this pack of wolves and their offsprings has delighted wildlife researches
 
 
Hunting is one of the main reasons wolves have gone extinct in the area
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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